Jessica Hoffmann

Oct 31: Be Bold Wear Red

Filed By Jessica Hoffmann | October 26, 2007 2:18 PM | comments

Filed in: Action Alerts, The Movement
Tags: women of color

From a coalition of women-of-color-led organizations:

"We understand that October 31, 2007 is Halloween. For most families it’s a time to be with their children. Even though Halloween is about “fake” and “imagined” terrors, the violence committed against women of color is very “real.” Not only is it a “real” reality on October 31st, but it’s also a “real” terror for the rest of the year."

Go here for information on Red rallies, how to share stories that break the silence around violence, and more.


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This is an awesome idea, so much so that I'd like to see it used not only on Halloween, but also at other times when such symbolism is called for. Wearing red is not only a simple idea that is easy to implement, but is noticeable and makes the statement loud and clear to those tuned-in enough to receive it.

And hey besides, now I have a really good excuse to wear my Mary Marvel costume (in Second Life, anyway).

Not to be difficult, but what good does wearing red on Halloween do? It's a festive holiday with most folks (or at least the majority of kids) donning costumes to trick or treat or party.

I don't think many people will participate. And I don't think most of the rest of us will notice those who do participate or even realize they're participating in anything!

I'm kinda wondering what this will do as well. Although the problem of people now know what it means can be solved with blog posts, at least partly....

I don't want to speak for the organizers in answering this -- I think their statements at documentthesilence.wordpress.com speak better than I could for them. Personally, I tend to think that each piece of activism plays a role in a larger, heterogeneous collection of actions that together move us toward change. An action like this has many possible meanings and effects -- visibility, building a sense of community/solidarity among people who participate, even sparking conversations like this one about the effectiveness of various activist strategies ...

Personally, I tend to think that each piece of activism plays a role in a larger, heterogeneous collection of actions that together move us toward change.

We can agree on this. I'm just wondering if there wouldn't be more effective ways to advocate around this issue. Going up against Halloween takes a lot more organization and publicity than this has received so far - our blog post notwithstanding, of course. :)