Jessica Hoffmann

Just Launched! Enough: The Personal Politics of Resisting Capitalism

Filed By Jessica Hoffmann | July 31, 2008 3:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Living, Living, Media, Politics, Politics, The Movement, The Movement
Tags: Dean Spade, economic justice, Resisting Capitalism, Sustainable Grassroots Movements, Tyrone Boucher

I'm very excited to let you know about the launch of Enough. Created and edited by the wonderful Tyrone Boucher and Dean Spade:

Enough is a space for conversations about how a commitment to wealth redistribution plays out in our lives: how we decide what to have, what to keep, what to give away; how we work together to build sustainable grassroots movements; how we challenge capitalism in daily, revolutionary ways.

Spend some time there -- read, respond, submit ...


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Robert Ganshorn Robert Ganshorn | August 2, 2008 2:26 AM

Jessica, thank you for the information and I have visited the site. I found the story of the young woman remembering Indian shoemakers missing limbs as a small child quite moving. It was the first time she thought about money when her grandmother later said to her when asking her to keep a promise: "Remember, promise breaker...shoe maker."

We keep pretending that there is only a moral component to poverty when there is really, in my opinion, a great educational component to poverty. I have known and been and lived with poor persons my entire life, but we were working poor people who got a better education with each generation and did better subsequently.

I note that one of the founders of this site describes herself as having working class parents, but growing up "owning class." I find this confusing as working class persons very often own their homes, cars etc. They just own less house or an older car. Working class persons I know are less likely to use credit in a lavish manner and more likely to save to make a great purchase unless it is a dire emergency.

"Income redistribution" is another way of saying "soak the rich" which is a group to which I do not belong, but have familiarity. When I and my father worked (on his second job) keeping the garden of a wealthy banker they were also members of our church and were kind to our family. For all their money were they happier than we? No, not at all, in fact they and people who are blessed/cursed with excessive money often have a great problem determining who they can trust and become insular. Before the banker my father worked for a local printer performing the same humble tasks and they were kind people, but happy, because they were merely content and grateful for their accomplishments and were open to others. Happiness does not just mean income.

As long as there is capitol the owners of it will expect a return on their investment. Capitol is vital to job creation. Capitol creates opportunities for people, but it creates no happiness for anyone in and of itself. Neither will redistribution of capitol create anything except a complacency. "Socialism" in it's aggressive forms creates a false sense of security that masks a bankruptcy of self esteem. It is a rush to the average and a stifling of the exceptional. It legitimizes inefficiency and insures our societal inadequacy in a world where we have many competitors who would not follow this course.

with socialism would Bill Gates and Warren Buffet the number one and two wealthiest persons in the world have been able to amass a fortune to give away as is presently happening? It will all "get better" when people open up to how little they need to be happy while striving to be the best humans they can be. All else is window dressing.

Robert Ganshorn Robert Ganshorn | August 2, 2008 3:08 AM

Jessica, thank you for the information and I have visited the site. I found the story of the young woman remembering Indian shoemakers missing limbs as a small child quite moving. It was the first time she thought about money when her grandmother later said to her when asking her to keep a promise: "Remember, promise breaker...shoe maker."

We keep pretending that there is only a moral component to poverty when there is really, in my opinion, a great educational component to poverty. I have known and been and lived with poor persons my entire life, but we were working poor people who got a better education with each generation and did better subsequently.

I note that one of the founders of this site describes herself as having working class parents, but growing up "owning class." I find this confusing as working class persons very often own their homes, cars etc. They just own less house or an older car. Working class persons I know are less likely to use credit in a lavish manner and more likely to save to make a great purchase unless it is a dire emergency.

"Income redistribution" is another way of saying "soak the rich" which is a group to which I do not belong, but have familiarity. When I and my father worked (on his second job) keeping the garden of a wealthy banker they were also members of our church and were kind to our family. For all their money were they happier than we? No, not at all, in fact they and people who are blessed/cursed with excessive money often have a great problem determining who they can trust and become insular. Before the banker my father worked for a local printer performing the same humble tasks and they were kind people, but happy, because they were merely content and grateful for their accomplishments and were open to others. Happiness does not just mean income.

As long as there is capitol the owners of it will expect a return on their investment. Capitol is vital to job creation. Capitol creates opportunities for people, but it creates no happiness for anyone in and of itself. Neither will redistribution of capitol create anything except a complacency. "Socialism" in it's aggressive forms creates a false sense of security that masks a bankruptcy of self esteem. It is a rush to the average and a stifling of the exceptional. It legitimizes inefficiency and insures our societal inadequacy in a world where we have many competitors who would not follow this course.

with socialism would Bill Gates and Warren Buffet the number one and two wealthiest persons in the world have been able to amass a fortune to give away as is presently happening? It will all "get better" when people open up to how little they need to be happy while striving to be the best humans they can be. All else is window dressing.

Indeed, this sort of thing is needed on a daily basis. There are lots of great sites out there that help us make abstract ideas very personal.

OK, I didn't read the site, but I bookmarked and I'll check it out later. :)