Serena Freewomyn

New Studies Show Girls Have Eliminated the Math Gap

Filed By Serena Freewomyn | July 30, 2008 2:00 PM | comments

Filed in: The Movement
Tags: biology, gender differences, math, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Remember the posts I ran a few weeks ago about the biological basis of gender differences? One of the articles discussed the myth that girls are inherently bad at math. Well, last week the University of Wisconsin-Madison released a study showing that the math scores of girls and boys have become equal. After sifting through mountains of data - including SAT results and math scores from 7 million students who were tested in accordance with the No Child Left Behind Act - a team of scientists says that the old adage that girls are bad at math just isn't true. Whether they looked at average performance, the scores of the most gifted children or students' ability to solve complex math problems, girls measured up to boys.

"There just aren't gender differences anymore in math performance," says University of Wisconsin-Madison psychology professor Janet Hyde, the study's leader. "So parents and teachers need to revise their thoughts about this."

Though girls take just as many advanced high school math courses today as boys, and women earn 48 percent of all mathematics bachelor's degrees, the stereotype persists that girls struggle with math, says Hyde. Not only do many parents and teachers believe this, but scholars also use it to explain the dearth of female mathematicians, engineers and physicists at the highest levels.

Cultural beliefs like this are "incredibly influential," she says, making it critical to question them. "Because if your mom or your teacher thinks you can't do math, that can have a big impact on your math self concept."

To carry out its query, the team acquired math scores from state exams now mandated annually under No Child Left Behind (NCLB), along with detailed statistics on test takers, including gender, grade level and ethnicity, in 10 states. Using data from more than 7 million students, they then calculated the "effect size," a statistic that reports the degree of difference between girls' and boys' average math scores in standardized units. The effect sizes they found - ranging from 0.01 and 0.06 - were basically zero, indicating that average scores of girls and boys were the same.

"Boys did a teeny bit better in some states, and girls did a teeny bit better in others," says Hyde. "But when you average them all, you essentially get no difference."

Some critics argue, however, that even when average performance is equal, gender discrepancies may still exist at the highest levels of mathematical ability. So the team searched for those, as well. For example, they compared the variability in boys' and girls' math scores, the idea being that if more boys fell into the top scoring percentiles than girls, the variance in their scores would be greater.

Again, the effort uncovered little difference, as did a comparison of how well boys and girls did on questions requiring complex problem solving. What the researchers did find, though, was a disturbing lack of questions that tested this ability. In fact, they found none whatsoever on the state assessments for NCLB, requiring them to turn to another data source for this part of the study.

What this suggests, says Hyde, is that if teachers are gearing instruction toward these assessments, the performance of both boys and girls in complex problem solving may drop in the future, leaving them ill-prepared for careers in math, science and engineering.

"This skill can be taught in the classroom," she says, "but we need to motivate teachers to do so by including those items on the tests."

The study's final piece was a review of the granddaddy of all high school math tests, the SAT. The fact that boys score better on it than girls has been widely publicized, contributing to the public's notion that boys truly are better at math. But Hyde and her co-authors think there's another explanation: sampling artifact.

For one thing, because it's administered only to college-bound seniors, the SAT is hardly a random sample of all students. What's more, greater numbers of girls take the test now than boys, because more girls are going to college. "So you're dipping farther down into the distribution of female talent, which brings down the average score," says Hyde. "That may be the explanation for (the results), rather than girls aren't as good as math."

So if we can have a female Speaker of the House and a woman running for president, and the numbers don't bear out the stereotype that girls are intellectually inferior to boys, what is driving it's staying power? A couple of junior high school girls from Minnesota have an answer:

In middle school, "girls aren't supposed to show their real potential and how smart they are," said Karlie Chase, a seventh-grader at Shakopee Middle School who attended a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) camp at Normandale Community College on Thursday. "They're worried they won't have friends," added Rebecca Kickert, a ninth-grader at Shakopee Junior High.

Having been through junior high myself, I can attest to the truth of their statements. It's sad that things haven't changed much since I struggled to make friends back in the day. But hey . . . at least girls have science on their side now. The smart girls will use this to their advantage.


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Serena, I have a question, since you've obviously crunched the numbers on this study: in general, have the math scores dropped or gone up in general? I suppose I'm asking if the boys went backwards, or the girls went forward, or both ways to make a median number in between?

My wife's a microbiologist, and she definitely got the math gene I didn't inherit. My mother had it, too. I can't do math without a calculator.

Polar, it was my understanding from reading the summary of the report that boys have remained the same while girls have gotten better.

Didn't the last study that you blogged about show that girls still lagged behind?

Again, the effort uncovered little difference, as did a comparison of how well boys and girls did on questions requiring complex problem solving. What the researchers did find, though, was a disturbing lack of questions that tested this ability. In fact, they found none whatsoever on the state assessments for NCLB, requiring them to turn to another data source for this part of the study.

That's really important. GWB wants to make students in most public schools good little workers - good at basic math and basic familiarity with pure reason, but not much practice in applying it for themselves to their own problems. So then they can read numbers, count, do basic calculations, and think through basic situations, but not actually improve their lives.

That's the scariest part of NCLR to me, the fact that it's pretty obviously just designed to keep critical thinking skills with the wealthy. That doesn't do much for America as a whole, but I'm sure the Bush family will be better off.

On the issue of gender discrepancy, lets see how much coverage a study that shows that there isn't much math difference between girls and boys will get.