Bil Browning

Andrew Tobias's remarks at the DNCC

Filed By Bil Browning | August 26, 2008 11:00 AM | comments

Filed in: Politics
Tags: Andrew Tobias, Democratic National Convention, Democratic Party, DNCC, economic policy

Andrew Tobias, the Democratic Party treasurer and openly gay man, gave a speech last night at the DNCC. I grabbed a copy of his remarks to share with Projectors.

My fellow Democrats, this is the third time I've had the privilege of addressing you: first in 2000, when things were great, with surpluses as far as the eye could see; then in 2004, when we'd already veered sharply off course; and now, in 2008, when Republican mismanagement has really hit home around the kitchen table, where the bills are paid. But we can begin to change that. Because we sure can't afford four more years of this.

The fact is that the economy and the stock market do better under Democratic administrations. And one of the reasons is surely whom Democrats turn to for advice. Senator Obama turns to people like Warren Buffet, the best-respected businessman in the world, and to former Treasury secretaries Rubin and Summers, who helped Bill Clinton shake off the economic malaise of the first George Bush.

Rest after the jump.

Senator McCain turns to lobbyists like Phil Gramm. You know the guy who said, "We're just a nation of whiners." Are we really? Eight years ago, virtually everyone in America was doing better, from richest to poorest. Now look. Inflation is up. Foreclosures are up. Gas is up. Job losses are up. And our national debt -- just 30 percent of GDP when the Reagan-Bush voodoo economics began, will be up to 70 percent -- $10 trillion -- by the time George W. Bush finally leaves office.

Meanwhile Phil Gramm spends his time accusing us of being down. About the only guy who seems to have done really well these last eight years is a guy with a private jet and so many homes that he loses count. In just the last eight years, the Republicans have cut the value of the U.S. dollar almost in half and added $4 trillion to our children's debt. They've done this in just eight years. And now they want four more?

As an investor, I yearn for a president who looks to financial heroes, not corporate lobbyists, for economic advice. As a gay man, I yearn for a president who believes in equal rights for all Americans. But most of all, as an American, I yearn for a president that the world can root for and be inspired by. Because having much of the world on our side again would not only be good for our national security, it would be good for business. Vote Obama, my fellow Democrats. Because, boy, do we ever need a change.


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Andrew Tobias is also a published gay author, including his novel The Best Little Boy In The World.

Roger Winters | August 27, 2008 2:43 PM

I'm a Hoosier who came to the State of Washington in 1972. I've given enormous amounts of time to the movement here for the legal equality and human dignity of all LGBT people. Some of the credit goes to Andrew Tobias. Seattle has been my home since 1977. (I note at times that "Indiana is a great place to be FROM." I nevertheless appreciate my Hoosier roots.)

The Indianapolis and Bloomington of my time were not gay-friendly (nowhere was, except for a few neighborhoods in the most populous cities). While at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (in Political Science) I met and observed Andrew Tobias, then a Business School student, because we frequented the same bar, Sporter's on Cambridge Street in Boston. (We were not each other's "type," so we did not interact much there.)

After Andrew wrote his book about his "Vast Fortune," I e-mailed him and found him to have become a cordial, thoughtful, and powerful out Gay adult. We reviewed how we were in our Sporter's days and took stock of how we've both changed for the better, as we changed the world, each in his own way. I thanked him for "Best Little Boy in the World," originally published under a pseudonym, for it has been a seminal book that greatly influenced me and helped empower a great many activists from our generation.

Perhaps our entire LGBT generation, certainly everyone I have asked, felt the pressure. We had to excel in order to earn the respect of others and, more fundamentally, to continue the coverups that were essential to our survival. Doing well was a necessity for the Gay men gifted enough actually to be "best" in some way. Andrew's "Best Little Boy..." helped us see how we survived by taking on the tremendous pressure to be stars and to maintain that standing indefinitely. If we were ordinary, we thought, we would always be under threat of exposure because there would be no cover story to which we could refer when needing to deflect questions.

Now that Andrew Tobias is helping lead the DNC as Treasurer, I hope everyone appreciates how the pressure under which he grew up benefitted our community and the progressive political community to which he has given his considerable talents. Thank you for highlighting and reproducing his speech at the Denver Convention.

Roger Winters | August 27, 2008 2:49 PM

I'm a Hoosier who came to the State of Washington in 1972. I've given enormous amounts of time to the movement here for the legal equality and human dignity of all LGBT people. Some of the credit goes to Andrew Tobias. Seattle has been my home since 1977. (I note at times that "Indiana is a great place to be FROM." I nevertheless appreciate my Hoosier roots.)

The Indianapolis and Bloomington of my time were not gay-friendly (nowhere was, except for a few neighborhoods in the most populous cities). While at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (in Political Science) I met and observed Andrew Tobias, then a Business School student, because we frequented the same bar, Sporter's on Cambridge Street in Boston. (We were not each other's "type," so we did not interact much there.)

After Andrew wrote his book about his "Vast Fortune," I e-mailed him and found him to have become a cordial, thoughtful, and powerful out Gay adult. We reviewed how we were in our Sporter's days and took stock of how we've both changed for the better, as we changed the world, each in his own way. I thanked him for "Best Little Boy in the World," originally published under a pseudonym, for it has been a seminal book that greatly influenced me and helped empower a great many activists from our generation.

Perhaps our entire LGBT generation, certainly everyone I have asked, felt the pressure. We had to excel in order to earn the respect of others and, more fundamentally, to continue the coverups that were essential to our survival. Doing well was a necessity for the Gay men gifted enough actually to be "best" in some way. Andrew's "Best Little Boy..." helped us see how we survived by taking on the tremendous pressure to be stars and to maintain that standing indefinitely. If we were ordinary, we thought, we would always be under threat of exposure because there would be no cover story to which we could refer when needing to deflect questions.

Now that Andrew Tobias is helping lead the DNC as Treasurer, I hope everyone appreciates how the pressure under which he grew up benefitted our community and the progressive political community to which he has given his considerable talents. Thank you for highlighting and reproducing his speech at the Denver Convention.

Roger Winters | August 27, 2008 4:08 PM

I'm a Hoosier who came to the State of Washington in 1972. I've given enormous amounts of time to the movement here for the legal equality and human dignity of all LGBT people. Some of the credit goes to Andrew Tobias. Seattle has been my home since 1977. (I note at times that "Indiana is a great place to be FROM." I nevertheless appreciate my Hoosier roots.)

The Indianapolis and Bloomington of my time were not gay-friendly (nowhere was, except for a few neighborhoods in the most populous cities). While at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (in Political Science) I met and observed Andrew Tobias, then a Business School student, because we frequented the same bar, Sporter's on Cambridge Street in Boston. (We were not each other's "type," so we did not interact much there.)

After Andrew wrote his book about his "Vast Fortune," I e-mailed him and found him to have become a cordial, thoughtful, and powerful out Gay adult. We reviewed how we were in our Sporter's days and took stock of how we've both changed for the better, as we changed the world, each in his own way. I thanked him for "Best Little Boy in the World," originally published under a pseudonym, for it has been a seminal book that greatly influenced me and helped empower a great many activists from our generation.

Perhaps our entire LGBT generation, certainly everyone I have asked, felt the pressure. We had to excel in order to earn the respect of others and, more fundamentally, to continue the coverups that were essential to our survival. Doing well was a necessity for the Gay men gifted enough actually to be "best" in some way. Andrew's "Best Little Boy..." helped us see how we survived by taking on the tremendous pressure to be stars and to maintain that standing indefinitely. If we were ordinary, we thought, we would always be under threat of exposure because there would be no cover story to which we could refer when needing to deflect questions.

Now that Andrew Tobias is helping lead the DNC as Treasurer, I hope everyone appreciates how the pressure under which he grew up benefitted our community and the progressive political community to which he has given his considerable talents. Thank you for highlighting and reproducing his speech at the Denver Convention.