Father Tony

Which god is driving the bus?

Filed By Father Tony | December 31, 2008 11:30 AM | comments

Filed in: Living, The Movement
Tags: Frank Rich, Obama Inauguration, personal god, Rick Warren, universal god

It becomes clear that as we switch out the god we have in the driver's seat, each of the passengers will eventually and in turn be thrown under the bus. There is no universal god. Only an extremely personal one. The invocation at the inauguration ought to consist of five minutes of silence to allow each attendee to to burn mental incense to god or Santa Claus or to go outside for a smoke.

For the best reflection on this to date, read Frank Rich's You're Likable Enough, Gay People. While reading it, I asked C if Frank Rich is gay. He replied, "No. He's Jewish and a New Yorker."

(For those of you who don't get that - and I doubt there are many - the next time you take your mother or aunt to a Broadway musical, ask them if they realize how much of the National Humor is either gay or Jewish.)


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This has to be two of the truest sentences ever written on the site.

There is no universal god. Only an extremely personal one.

"There is no universal god. Only an extremely personal one. The invocation at the inauguration ought to consist of five minutes of silence to allow each attendee to to burn mental incense to god or Santa Claus or to go outside for a smoke."

Well said.

Haha, Frank Rich. He's not bad.

The invocation at the inauguration ought to consist of five minutes of silence to allow each attendee to to burn mental incense to god or Santa Claus or to go outside for a smoke.

Supposedly, somewhere in the UN Building in NYC, there is an international meditation room, intended to promote moments of private spiritual thought. Since there was no way to represent all religions in the world, the room is devoid of all religious symbols.

Unfortunately, the room is so uninspiring ... and outright boring ... that almost no one ever uses it.

Beck Chapel at Indiana University - Bloomington has fallen into the same malaise. It was originally a beautiful little Christian chapel from which all religious symbols have now been removed. There is the occasional wedding, but almost no one goes there to contemplate individually.

The idea of "five minutes of silence" has merit, but unfortunately too many religious people cannot separate the form of their faith from its content, and it tends to be the fundamentalists of any religion that have the greatest difficulty at this.

Those into religion tend to need a meditation space attuned to their specific faith tradition --- and those whose spirituality has moved beyond form can meditate anywhere.

P.S. I still don't get the joke. Frank Rich is gay. And Jewish. And a New Yorker.