Paige Schilt

Timetables: Trains, Gender, Empathy

Filed By Paige Schilt | December 23, 2009 4:30 PM | comments

Filed in: Living, The Movement, Transgender & Intersex
Tags: childhood development, Christmas, gender, genderqueer, LGBT parent, parenting

Last Christmas, we decided to splurge and spend a few nights at a fancy beach resort. From the moment the clerk ushered us into the "VIP check-in room," I knew we were in for an adventure. Our five-year-old, Waylon, plunged head first into a butter-colored club chair. "Honey, please keep your shoes off the furniture," I said, feeling my class insecurities creep up like a slow and annoying blush. "But, Mama, I'm a seal," he informed me, resting his front flippers on the marble floor.

I scanned the clerk's face, hoping for the knowing look that tells you you're in the presence of Family. Nary a blip on the old gaydar. His eyes were resolutely glued to his computer screen.

My wife, Katy, was not helping. Early that morning, she'd loaded up our vacation baggage. Then she'd navigated the car through hectic holiday traffic. Now she slouched in the chair beside me, tattooed arms folded across her pecs, head tilted back in a caricature of repose. Mirrored sunglasses shielded her eyes. She was ready for a nap.

I gamely answered the check-in questions, keeping one eye on Waylon, who was maneuvering across the floor on his belly. Like his parents, he was clad in black. His t-shirt was emblazoned with an electric guitar and the words "Toxic Waste." I wondered how the clerk was perceiving our tousled entourage. Perhaps he thought that only the truly rich and famous would be bold enough to despoil the Sand Pearl Resort with such dishevelment. Did he think we might be rock stars?

Apparently, he sized us up and designated us "Mr. and Mrs. Schilt."

As in, "well, Mr. and Mrs. Schilt, we hope you enjoy your stay."

"The bellman will get those bags, Mr. Schilt."

"Can I get you some ice, Mrs. Schilt?"

Thus registered in the hotel's central database, we seemed doomed to pass the remainder of our holiday as hapless characters in a comedy of errors.

***
When Waylon was three years old, we started trying to include him in the ritual of holiday gift giving. "Waylon," I began, "what do you think Mommy would like for Christmas?"

"Trains," he said, without missing a beat.

What do you think Grandma would like?" I persisted.

"Trains."

"What do you think we should get for Auntie?" By this time I was just fishing.

"Trains."

Waylon is a boy with a single-minded passion for wheeled vehicles. When he got his first train set, he didn't sleep for three nights. Eventually, in the kind of problem solving that emerges from intense sleep deprivation, I found myself napping on the couch at 3 am while Waylon navigated Thomas the Tank around the track.

By the next Christmas, Waylon's allegiance had switched to cars, but gift-giving was still largely an exercise. With lots of not-so-subtle encouragement from his parents, Waylon strung some necklaces for friends and family, but he hadn't really developed the capacity to imagine another person's needs and desires. Most of his handiwork looked like a random aggregation of begrudgingly selected shapes and colors.

Ironically, the one bright glimmer of hope was the necklace Waylon made for my sister, an old-school goth with a penchant for black tights, ripped crinolines, and creepy Victorian bonnets. When he sat down to make Auntie's necklace, Waylon carefully selected the darkest and most macabre beads in his little craft kit. Heartened, I consulted my child rearing bible, a tattered copy of Touchpoints, which reassured me that empathy--the capacity to imagine another person's needs and feelings--develops along a slow and uneven trajectory.

***
One day, not long after Waylon made his Aunt a gothic necklace, Katy and I were stretched out on the couch of our couples therapist's beigely appointed office. (We jokingly refer to our therapist as Guru--partly because of her preference for New Age shawls and partly because we truly believe that she is brilliant, compassionate, and wise.) On this particular day, we were talking about parenting (our favorite easy topic), and I happened to mention some of Waylon's ideas about gender.

Guru's normally unflappable exterior betrayed a hint of concern. As her eyebrow arched upward, I moved defensively to the edge of the couch. Guru asked a follow-up question. And then another.

"We've always talked about my surgery," Katy explained. "He knows that I never felt completely like a girl and that I changed my chest to be more comfortable in my body."

"He has his own vocabulary," I added. "He calls Katy a 'boy-girl.'"

Our therapist seemed most concerned about whether Waylon believed that his own gender and sex might be malleable. According to psychoanalytic timetables, core gender identity is supposed to be consolidated by two or three years of age. Were Guru's pursed lips suggesting that we were in danger of derailing our child's development?

Part of me felt defiant, wanting to challenge the whole notion of static gender identity. Another (irrational) part of me was sure she was going to call Child Protective Services the moment we left her office.

Queer people have been told for so long that we are not fit to be parents. It is impossible not to internalize some of the shame that is projected onto us, especially when it comes to our culture's most hallowed idol, the family. So I felt the sting of my therapist's troubled look. But I also understood that her reaction was rooted in the assumption that what's normal is natural and good.

As queer parents, our blessing is to remember all the coaxing, coercion, and even outright violence it takes to make normal gender development seem inevitable and desirable. By the logic of that trajectory, we did not turn out okay--yet we know that we turned out okay. If we can hold onto this contradiction, if we can resist the shame, we can forge new family values that affirm gender diversity as a precious gift to the world.

***
On one of our first dates, my future wife brought a tape of her family's home movies from the mid-60s and a joint. I think Katy guessed that my feminist consciousness was going to need expanding if we were to swap childhood stories in the way that new lovers do. She'd dated enough Women's Studies majors to guess that "the cultural construction of gender" would be my mantra, the magic words that were supposed to save me from the depressing determinism of biology as destiny and the one-size-fits-all essentialism of universal sisterhood.

Savvy as Katy was, she could hardly have anticipated the intensity of my views. I leaned fervently, incontrovertibly toward the nurture side of the nature vs. nurture debate. If anyone spoke to me of gender as something innate or remotely natural, I did the intellectual equivalent of covering my ears and shouting "la,la, la, I can't hear you!"

Now, in reel after reel, I discovered Katy at 2, 3, and 4--already miraculously masculine, already chaffing like a football player in frilly dresses, already looking dejected when she unwrapped yet another doll from underneath the Christmas tree.

Suddenly, the whole notion of nature vs. nurture ceased to make sense. Her pintsize Texan masculinity was culturally pitch-perfect--and a total violation of the prevailing gender system. It was incongruent with biology--and undeniably physical, emanating from every muscle and gesture.

The highlight of the home movie festival was the year when she appeared next to the Christmas tree in full Davy Crockett regalia. A second later, the wrapping paper was off, and she was jumping up and down, triumphantly brandishing a new BB gun.

"Dude," I said, "this is blowing my mind."

***
Last December, we made a family trip to Target to find a gift for Waylon's friend Layla, whom he's known from infancy. As I was hefting Waylon into the cart, I asked him what he thought Layla would like, fully expecting him to list his latest vehicular obsessions.

"Umm, I think...Barbie."

Has ever a parenting moment been more bittersweet? I hugged him and showered him with praise for thinking about someone else's feelings.

Privately, I was imagining my white, blonde, blue-eyed son delivering a Barbie to his brown-skinned, black-haired girl friend. It looked like a tableau with the caption "Gender and Imperialism."

Luckily, at that moment, Katy arrived from parking the car and settled the matter with a phone call to Layla's aunt. It turned out that Waylon was right; Layla was expecting a Barbie Dream House from Santa. And she needed furniture. Relieved that we would not be solely responsible for introducing Layla to Barbie, I followed my family to the toy aisle, where we proceeded to ponder tiny pink bedroom sets.

***
A few days later, we were installed at the fancy beach resort. It was beginning to dawn on me that $200 a night buys an alarmingly frequent level of personal contact. The entire staff seemed to be connected by walkie-talkie; as we passed from reception to the lobby to our room, we were repeatedly greeted as "Mr. and Mrs. Schilt."

Although her identity is somewhere between genders, Katy is quite content to pass in such situations. It's her voice that usually gives her away. That evening, in the time it took to for the waiter to unpack our room service order, she had gone from "Mr. Schilt" to "ma'am." We joked about it on the way to the airport, imagining a one-woman show called "From Mister to Ma'am."

No to be left out of the joke, Waylon said, "Yeah, he didn't realize that you were a girl-boy," in a tone of five-year-old comic exasperation.

"Wait, I thought you called Mommy a 'boy-girl,'" I said, confused.

"No, that was back when I was only thinking of myself, so I always put 'boy' first. But now I'm thinking of other people," he explained.

My parenting manuals say that five years old is when kids begin to develop the capacity to empathize with other people's emotions and experiences. According to that developmental timetable, Waylon was right on schedule.


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So many lovely bits, and this one in particular is still keeping me in giggles:

"Privately, I was imagining my white, blonde, blue-eyed son delivering a Barbie to his brown-skinned, black-haired girl friend. It looked like a tableau with the caption "Gender and Imperialism.""

Thanks for writing this.

This story was lovely, thank you. I hate checking into hotels with my boyfriend and never knowing whether the staff will be decent.

What a sweet story. I have found, as a parent myself, that the love of children knows no dogma.

I have two friends, both named Steve who have a lovely and bright little boy. Of course they've had to put up with the ignorance and prejudice from community and family but TC is the most doted upon and well adjusted little boy I know. He is also very heterosexual. At 7 now, he knows that his family is different from most others and there is a certain amount of bigotry he has to put up with too, not only from other children but distressingly, almost criminally, from adults around him. I think people have a lot harder time getting rid of their prejudices when they are proven wrong. It's a shame.

Brynn Craffey Brynn Craffey | December 24, 2009 12:02 AM

Paige, so much to love in this! (As usual.) Waylon's a lucky little boy to have such a wonderful family.

Wonderful stories. I have five kids and one foster kid and none of them followed the books by the experts in development. Parenting is a strange journey that you two seem to be taking very well.

wonderful piece - as (one of) the mothers of a four year old Princess-loving girly girl, I learn more from her about life that most people I know. whether it is her understanding that this particular mommy is better suited as a prince when playing or her unique way of playing soccer in a twirly, swirly skirt and pink converse sneakers (yes, Santa, ahem, got her a pink soccer ball and she loved it). but most of all our kids seem to be at the age where judgement and difference are not something they have experienced much of at all (at least in our households, it seems)