Alex Blaze

The Prop 8 trial will get YouTubed

Filed By Alex Blaze | January 07, 2010 1:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Politics
Tags: boies, gay marriage, marriage, olson, Prop. 8, same-sex marriage

Both Joe and I posted about the controversy in the Ninth Circuit over whether or not to broadcast the federal Prop 8 challenge. The Prop 8 defenders said that their witnesses would be intimidated and look like idiots if people heard them argue. The judge decided yesterday that the Prop 8 trial will be broadcast, on YouTube, with a one-day delay, in case the judge decides someone's face or voice should be distorted.

He cited the wide interest in the case and said most of the witnesses will be campaign officials or academic experts accustomed to speaking in public.

"I've always thought that if the public could see how the judicial process works, they would take a somewhat different view of it," the judge said.

There's no jury, possibly-innocent criminal defendant, or minor children to worry about being broadcast here, so there's no real reason not to broadcast.

The same-sex couples of California who want to get married specifically, and queer people generally, are the people on trial here. They should have a chance to watch the proceedings since they have a stake in the outcome.


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I am very glad the case will be broadcast on YouTube. It will be far more accessible to people than if it was on cable television. People who can't afford the internet or cable will be able to access the video on library computers for years to come.

I'm also looking forward to the live streaming in Federal court houses throughout the 9th Circuit, including here in Seattle.