Antonia D'orsay

Making Trouble: Follow Ups - 1

Filed By Antonia D'orsay | March 03, 2010 12:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Media, The Movement
Tags: homosexual agenda, LGBT, marriage, political parties, politics, Queer Agenda, Questions, Transawareness

Of what use is making trouble if you don't keep at it?

In an earlier column, I asked 10 simple questions. I laid down some basic rules, and while some folks chose not to follow those basic rules, I got some answers, and I'm still hoping for more.

Learning from people is not always a simple process. You can't just ask one question, you see. You ask one, and then you listen to the answer, and then you ask another question based on that answer. People are different -- as the answers have already shown -- and since I've set aside my own thoughts on this so far, I'm able to pay close attention.

So, now it's follow up time. I'm still learning from you, the readers, and I'm interested in what you have to say. So, here are some more questions for you, based on the answers that were given in the last one.

This is also the first of four follow-ups. There have been and will be additional posts on the subject (all of them making trouble) as well -- one or two more, most likely. Then I will wrap it up with an overview of what you all have taught me and my own perspective on things -- both before and after.

I will stipulate a few rules to this process. I realize some people dislike that even as a merest suggestion, but I think it's important as people need to do it. I'm not changing the rules, either.

A. I'm not going to comment on the posting. I'm learning from you. One of the things some people have said is that I don't listen to others, that I don't give them a shot. Well, this is that chance.

B. Don't critique or criticize another poster's responses. That's going to be hard. In fact, that's going to be damn hard given the questions I'm going to ask.

C. Answer the questions. No vacillating, no talking about subjects that are germane but not part of the actual answer. No guessing about what I mean in asking them, and don't worry about what I might think or others might think about your answers. There's no sinister motive behind this, and if you think the questions are some kind of trap, well, as far as I'm concerned, you have some issues with paranoia.

D. This is just about the questions. Not me, not other commenters, not Bilerico, not some greater good or lesser evil, not about who did what to whom with that where and if they enjoyed it or not. Just the questions.

And now, the questions:

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?

2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?

3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?

4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?

5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)

6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?

7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?

8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?

9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?

10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?

Lastly, my personal deep appreciation and gratitude to those who answered the last set. I'm hoping that many of you (and more people, as well) will have the patience to put up with me while I ask you more questions.

Thank you, for helping me to learn.


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Angela Brightfeather | March 3, 2010 1:17 PM

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?

Yes, of course it can and it already has with the Matthew Shepard Hate Crimes legislation. In fact, the goal of most legislation is to try to cover as many people as possible that would be affected by the need for that particular legislation. This is why the ultimate legislation that would affect us postiviely regarding job protections is to pass a law that states that "no discrimination will be allowed against anyone." One can only dream.

2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?

There needs to be a clear cutoff point for those who even try to comment on Trans issues. That cutoff point has been and should be "presentation". It is as applicable today as it will be tomorrow. If there is a mistake in assessing an individual presentation, then the Trans person can distinguish that in the conversation. To do other wise is to buy into binary gender thinking. Whe in doubt, ask.

3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?

Only if it was directed at making it more difficult or out right discriminatory against Trans people, such as dress codes, bathroom usage or outright banning of SRS, changing birth certificates, name changes, etc. I cannot imagine a piece of legislation that would be positive FOR Trans people that would not require rolling in other communities as well.

4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?

Would because it made sense for more than just Trans people.
Would not because it would be to outright discriminatory even for far right wing people to try to do and it would probably have to define what is a man and what is a woman to work. Which would be referred to the Supreme Court eventually and as in the past, they would not take the case up, knowing that it is impossible not to discriminate against someone in the process of making the decision and definition.

5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)

No they are not. It is a human rights issues if we are talking about limiting or expanding freedoms. It is a civil rights issue if we are talking about being denied services or being made to pay an unfair price (unlike everyone else) for our freedoms. i.e. You cannot live in the opposite gender UNLESS you have had an operation to change your sex.

6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?
Homophobia and Transphobia.
Victimization and marginalization.
Being disliked or hated.
Targeted for violence and discrimination.
A strong sense of being treated unfairly at times.
General condemnation due to religious beliefs.
Being stereotyped negatively or just in general.

7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?

Gay & Lesbian.
Bisexual and Trans.

8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?

There should be none.

9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?

Of course. And there are also straight Trans folks, which you forgot to mention. as does everyone else in the GLBT community.

10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?

Of course.
See you did it again dummy. (Just kidding.)

Margaretpoa Margaretpoa | March 3, 2010 2:44 PM

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?
A) In some cases it can but there are enough issues that transgendered people face and vice versa that there needs to be some very specific tailoring sometimes.
2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?
A) Educate themselves and follow the simple rules of pronouns. Education though is paramount. Too many people refuse to be educated either due to laziness or due to scorn.
3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?
A) Unfortunately, probably not. Not unless there was some big, gruesome, well publicized case requiring legislation to redress the problem and probably not even then.
4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?
A) There are too many ugly stereotypes out there and far too many people who call themselves liberal or progressive want to use trans lives to bash other people as you so clearly pointed out recently.
5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)
A) Clearly they are both. Some people would like the right to marriage equality and that is more a civil right while some us don;t even enjoy the "right" to employment, services and shelter and those are arguably human rights issues.
6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?
A) We are all in a sexual minority and are looked at as the same by ignorant people. Personally I was once advised to "admit that (I'm), gay and get over it". I've always said that while we may not be in the same boat, we're in the same fleet.
7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?
A) Unfortunately the scorn and contempt from the public at large seems to be the common denominator that all L,G,B & T folks share.
8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?
A) Hmmm, I'm not sure I can answer that question intelligently. I guess it's a matter of degree. My "ally" may defend me up to a point while a family member will defend me regardless of cost to themselves.
9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?
A) Of course! Hetero ones too. Like me. I once had a deep, sincere, meaningful Lesbian relationship after I had become a woman and she'll always be very special to me but I just couldn't do the sex, without getting too graphic. Gender identity and sexual orientation are separate phenomena.
10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?
A) Again, of course. Being separate issues, one state doesn't preclude another.

Hope it helps. :-)
A)

1) No. LGB only legislation does not fully protect LGB people. Only by adding T wording does LGB legislation protect LGB. A law forbidding discrimination due to sexual orientation does not protect a gay person from being discriminated against due to gender expression. No, officer, I beat up that person because he was acting elleminate, not because he was gay.

2) If you don't have nothing nice to say, then don't say anything at all. What works best is to ask their name, and address them by name. Much more personal that way. When talking about groups of people, "transgender people" works best. After all, we are people.

3) No, without a vocal crowd, nothing will happen. And T tend to not be all that "Out" and vocal at the same time.

4) See 3

5) Both. To be able to have a job and a home is a civil right. The right to exist at all is a human right.

6&7) Gender expression is the single biggest ( and most incorrect) method to identify an LG person. And then there is the male supremacy that hurts many G as well as most L and T.

8) Who said a family member could remotely be an ally. Some are, smoe are not.

9) Yes, I know many.

10) No, they are the ones that do not want the added stigma of being trans.

. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?
I’m not a lawyer or a judge and I’ve heard the question answered both ways. My suspicion is that LG&B people would be easier to protect under “T” laws than the other way around.
2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?
? I suppose it depends on the CIS-person. I learn by “listening” to what transpeople say and write. I watch vlogs and documentaries produced or recommended by trans people. I’ve learned not to speak beyond my understanding which usually means speaking of things as matters of human dignity and fairness.
3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?
? Approached skillfully I think it might.
4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?
? If we couched the appeal in terms that everyone could identify with, it would be a simple matter of fairness. Middle America understands how beauty queens and tomboys are treated differently and that it tends to be inherently unfair. It would mean forgoing a lot of identity politics, but I think it is do-able.
5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)
? I think of it as a human rights issue.
6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?
? We are all beings who seek to find happiness and avoid suffering. Our efforts are often thwarted for the same or similar trumped up reasons.
7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?
? I think it depends on the person. I’m not sure.
8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?
? I don’t think there has to be a difference.
9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?
? Yes
10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?
? Yes

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?
(as pointed out, protective legislation for T
can probably protect GLB BETTER since many(cis) glb folk are gender folk, too,
*hrc*)

2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?
(WE need to consider the UMBRELLA concept,
and educate as to the differing groups
*held bondage*,er, kept dry under it
(joke!)
see post at 'Questioning Transphobia' re GENDERQUEER issues.we need to make clear we ALL exist)

3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?
(if lobbied correctly)

4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?
(too many reasons to go into, for me....)

5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)
(copping out , but i think both)

6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?
(gender stuff, marrige, identity, discrimination,
bigotry,dadt,enda etc etc in other words everything, potentially.)

7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?
(the parts where identities "MEET":
gay transpeople,bi,les, etc vs "straight")

8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?
(family is US. ally is THEM)

9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?
(hello!hello!...?
yes i guesss there are!lol who knew?)

10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?
(same answer as above...?
or did toni mean something sneaky?
lol
ps good job kid)
pps my bad:
*i hope BILERICO columnists will give THEIR
say here, too....hint hint*
(hits self really hard for rule breaking)

Dawn Dickinson | March 3, 2010 8:18 PM

1.I think it can. Provided said legislation can BE passed. However, I think there's a second component to this though, or an assumption. That being, since in a lot of instances visual identification of a T person (which may not be so obvious in LGB's outward appearance)could clue potential "haters" in on a T persons situation easier; so, unless these people (haters) are taught, retrained, sensitized or whatever, no amount of legislation will bring effective protection.

2. I suppose this would be dependent upon a number of factors. 1)Cis-person (CP) is an ally from whatever genre and has a desire to help in dialogue and effective change. 2) Whether CP is internet savvy. 3) CP has access to any number of written material, professional journals and studies accomplished on the subject and 4)CP has spent a qualitative amount of time discussing the issues we face first hand with a fair number of T folk from a broad range within that spectrum of diversity.

So, if CP has adequately invested in items 2,3& 4, then performing on item no.1 should not be a problem.

3. I cannot say it would, however, I will say it could.

4. Unfortunately, it may take such a heinous and egregious crime on a scale of that of Mathew Sheppard. Then again, it may happen when enough undeniable, indisputable physical evidence is presented from the scientific community that finally proclaims us to be who we say and know ourselves to be. A third possibility is for some within our community, by getting elected to everything from the local dog catcher to county board of supervisors to state office holdings, which allows us to be seen in a more favorable way. That we're not the "boogie man"; that we're not pedophiles; we're just hard working "normal" people that want to live "normal" lives.

Then again, it may require a perfect storm and have all three elements occur at the same time in order for the really dense legislators out there to "get it".

5. Without a doubt its a combination of both! We very much fit the same mould as movements that came before us in the civil rights arena. It's the violations of our basic human rights that makes ours a civil rights issue as well.

6. Though the prime difference between us is sexual identity vs. gender identity, all within the LGBT community can suffer from the commonality of oppression, persecution, discrimination, revulsion. Misunderstanding.

I think we all share the desire to be treated as an equal to any other human being in consideration of those basic civil and human rights.

7. The essential need for equality.

8. Not all ally's are family members and not all family members are ally's.

9. Hopefully your not asking from a clinical sense. However, I never considered myself to be gay or lesbian prior to transition and, I really do not consider myself lesbian now. Even though I am still married to my wife of 30 years. Does it matter? It doesn't alter the basic needs of civil and human rights either way.

10. Okay, which came first the chicken or the egg? Actually, again, does it matter? If this is supposed to be the commonality that keeps us together as a group, between this question and the last, I don't feel there's enough glue there to bond with. Either that or I missed the entire point of the last two questions, lol!

1)It can depending on wording. But wording is where compromises are made and subsequently where interpretation by police and judges can play. I prefer an explicit inclusion.

2)Hell if I know! I have gotten told off so many times now I can't count them anymore. I will say something exactly as a a trans friend suggests and still tick off someone else. But if I stand by and do nothing when I see transphobia I am assenting to it. I often feel damned if I do and damned if i don't and sometimes it makes me start to feel a little damned if I will.

3)I don't think so, I seriously don't.

4)A political reality is that politicians do what it takes to keep their jobs. Passing or even supporting a trans only issue is going to bring a politician into large amounts of fire and not much support. Few politicians for for what is right because it is right.

5)I see it mostly as a set of fundamental human rights issues with some civil rights issues. It is not about a civil right as in a right to vote or suffrage because trans people can vote. And yes maybe the right to serve in the military is a civil rights issue. But the primary issues that concern me as a more LGBT activist where trans people are concerned has to do with a right to be safe walking down the street and to maintain housing and a job, medical care. A right to not have the very state of being trans considered as equated with an offense against the law and as evidence of a criminal intent. These are, I believe, human rights.

6)Minority status. We are also all judged according to sexual and gender differences which are commonly confused by general society. Our particular slurs are often used for one another and so society has in many ways cast us into a position of having a common lot.

7)As I look at it I see us as having been cast into the same lifeboat and so our survival depends on one another. And that really is the main thing for me the common cause tilting at the same windmills of bigotry and ignorance. I have been asked why I want to be a girls just because I am not straight and I have seen my post op friend asked how young she was as a little boy when she realized that she was gay. And as messed up as those questions are they were both intended honestly in an attempt to learn and be supportive.

8) Family is stuck with you, allies might even want to be around you. A family person can be an ally. But the ally status is earned and it isn't just conferred by relationship. Being LGBT is nature but being an ally is nurture.

9 & 10)From my experience there are and I am not always happy with that situation. I see it as there are people and those people can be gay, straight, lesbian, bi or asexual and those people can be cis or trans. The words matter and this was the only set of questions that the wording bothered me since the identification of the person hood was in the last word of the sentences. Even from one of us the part about being a person was at the end.

california panda | March 4, 2010 3:03 AM

I didn't answer the last set of questions
but these tweaked something in me and on that
I feel I need to present this one woman's
opinion based on my own personal experience.

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks
also protect T folks?

A: It can and should. If you leave one person
out. who do you leave out the next time an
issue comes to be legislated?

2. How do cis folk learn what to say
when speaking about trans issues, when
trans people are so diverse?

A: The trans people who they meet and
interact with teach them how to respect
those differences. The key issue is that
those trans people who are "closeted" or
invisible and don't admit to their different
pasts simply don't have the will, intent,
or incentive to expose themselves to the
kind of scrutiny that the exposure would
engender. Do you have to be out loud and
proud? No but you have to be willing and
ready to admit your history. And, face
the questions that arise from that
admission.

3. Would trans only legislation pass
Congress?

A: Probably not simply because congress
is mired in both gridlock, willful ignorance,
and personal interest issues.

4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?

A: 1) It won't until serving the will of the
people and the common good takes precedence
over serving the will of the congressman and
winning the next election.
2) It won't until the weight of money donated
to congressmen from right wing special
interest groups is nullified.
3) It won't until politics and religion are
firmly and irrevocably separated. Like they
are supposed to be in this USofA.
4) It won't until religious ignorance,
intolerance, superstition, stereotyping
and bigotry become unacceptable in government.

It will when stupidity and self-serving attitudes
in government become unacceptable.

5. Is our effort to obtain rights a
civil rights issue or a human rights
issue? (Note: they are not entirely
the same thing.)

Human rights are supposedly those we are granted
simply by being human - fat chance in any
given society. Unfortunately you can't separate
human and civil rights in any given social
structure. The reason for that is because
all rights both civil and human rely on
the recognition and protection of those
rights from abuse by those who deny them.
Civil rights are granted and protected
by those who govern the affected individual.
You can claim any rights you want but until
those rights are recognized as valid and
protected, they simply don't exist. If they
did there would be no need for the process
of asylum.

6. What do the parts of the LGBT share
in common, if any?

We all share the effect of willful and
ignorant discrimination from people who
think they have all the answers to life's
issues and the right to enforce their
beliefs on others.

7. What parts of the LGBT have the
most in common?

All of us have in common the need to be
respected, valued, accepted, and protected.
It's not just about sexual orientation or
gender identity, it's about the right to
exist and to live one's life joyfully
and fearlessly. To classify and catagorize
LGBT people is to separate, and isolate
people within the group simply for the
purpose of diluting group efforts in
favor of special interest actions.

8. What is the difference between
"Ally" and "Family Member"?

From my own perspective, an ally is someone
who supports you as long as their goals and
your goals coincide and sometimes even when
they dont. A "family member" may or
may not support you at all even if their, and
your goals are aligned. A family member
may "throw you to the dogs" even if your
goals coincide. An ally generally will not.
But then I'm a trans woman. I know
family -- I've dealt with them. I don't know
many true allies.

9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual
trans folks?

Yah! Duh! But then you shouldn't really
have to be trans to know that.

10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or
bisexual folks?

I'd say they are both the same thing.
But that depends on what you put as a
priority -- sexual attraction or gender
identity. And again, depends on who's
doing the classifying and why.

battybattybats battybattybats | March 4, 2010 7:09 AM

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?

Sometimes, but it's not sufficient to assume it will. Same with Intersex. It must be worded inclusively, all legislation must cover as much of the population as possible especially Rights related where it must cover both active and passive claims on a right. There is a risk that poorly worded legislation may abuse the human rights of one group to help another when if worded well everyones rights and needs could be met.

E.G. legislation on medical decisions and children to prevent abuse of Intersex kids could if poorly worded effect the access to hormone blockers of Trans kids unless its made clear the right of the child and their 'best interest' is to maximum choice upon being able to give informed consent and to not have permanant choices made over them before that point rather than a poor wording saying that any sex-related treatment of children is wrong. And the well-worded example would protect other people such as oppossing female circumcision and lots more besides allowing people to choose for themselves whats done to their genitals.

2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?

By being taught about that diversity. Which is one reason why i support the new terms: S&GD Sex and Gender Diversity and SS&GD Sexuality Sex and Gender Diversity. When diversity is in the name it solves a lot of problems.

3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?

Maybe.

4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?

It polls well so it should but for some reasons there seems unexplained inertia involved in the representatives.

5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)

Civil Rights are a subset of Human Rights hence why the International Covenant on civil and Political Rights is considered a piece of Human Rights Legislation and was an oft-quoted document in Australians Human Rights Community Consultation. So it's most assuredly Both a Civil and Human Rights fight.

6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?

Oppression of mostly the same human rights and from prejudice that distinctly covers sex, gender and sexuality together.

7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?

The ones not yet covered by 'incremental' progress.

8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?

Family members may do nothing to help or may be unaccepting or intolerant or even directly oppossed to the rights of others. Family can even be the worst of the enemies. Allies act to help.

9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?

Yes.

10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?

Yes. Each person has the right to identify however they choose and I've seen both versions so then both versions exist.

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks? Yes. We face the same discrimination, in a lot of cases and some who are Trans* are also LGB.
2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse? By educating themselves. This involves a lot of work, but can be done.
3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress? Yes.
4. Why would it or why wouldn't it? It would pass Congress due to it being a discrimination issue that needs to be corrected and most likely will not self-correct. It would probably have a long uphill battle, just like our current one, but would be passed.
5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? Both.
6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any? We share a number of issues stemming from our all being different than what the mainstream people think we should be. We also share a number of advantages due to the same issues.
7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common? We all face same amount of discrimination from a majority of our detractors. The B and the T share a large amount of crap that they get from their own, a group of the LGBT.
8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?
An ally is a person who is not LGBT(QI) that is actively trying to help us in our fight for equality. A family member who is not actively helping us to achieve equality, but is providing positive emotional and/or spiritual/moral support can be considered an ally.
A family member is a person related to an LGBT(QIA) person that is not actively helping us to achieve our equality, while trying to influence us with negative emotions and/or spiritual/moral issues, or even actively working against our attempt to achieve equality.
9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks? Yes.
10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks? Yes.

SarasNavel | March 5, 2010 3:05 PM

Sorry I'm late, I forgot my locker combination...here's a note from my dog. Oh, no; she ate the note. Um, my moped wouldn't start, I had work to do, I was sick with food poisoning.

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?

It all depends on the exact words that eventually pass into law. Each of the following can be included or excluded, either intentionally or accidentally by sometimes subtle wording changes:

-medical status
-gender identity
-gender expression
-sexuality expression
-sexuality identity
-specific sexual acts

It all depends on whether the lawmakers intend to protect the person or the action. To do the job right and protect all LGB, any laws except for good ol' southern sodomy laws *should* protect based on gender expression and identity. 'Cause that's what is icky about gays and lesbians, right? (Disclosure: I'm not hetero).

2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?

Speak out and get attacked; learn from the experience. Try again with a slightly different crowd or topic and get attacked again. Keep going until you've learned that despite your mainstream social standing, in our subcultures your "trans privilege" may be nil. Odd feeling, isn't it?

I only partially jest. People of privilege *assume* that they have a right to speak for those without, but they never will. It must be earned and granted piecemeal by those subjugated by the topic at hand. And it's temporary, you have to re-apply periodically.

This is no different than if race, religion, political affiliation or any of a number of other attributes were substituted for 'trans'.

Tying to speak about the issues faced by any very specific group with unique attributes in our society is hard, like math hard. The level of specificity must match your level of solid knowledge, otherwise you risk being called on it. The answer(s)? Cis people that wish to speak out for us (ie politiicans, allies and the like) need to seek out contacts from which to learn enough to speak out without causing harm. Or, we need to speak up for ourselves. Or be given (via borrowed privilege) the opportunity to do so.

And by the way, this quesiton is a bit of a cheat since you know full well that 'trans' can be either TG or TS.

3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?

There you go again with the vague, "trans" again. Is that TS or TG or 'trans fatty acid'?

Regardless, it has already passed at so many local and state levels as well as covered by corporate policies. Somewhere (here on Bilerico? HufPo?), there is a post from ENDA'07 called, "Incrementalists' Dirty Little Secret". Simply put, we have appear to have less 'ick' than Gays, despite the way certain religions, politicians and lobbying orgs try to sell us.

Also, Federal TS-only legislation has already passed in the form of Sen. Helms' ADA ammendment which excludes excluding those that are TS for "medical reasons".

4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?

After the last batch of questions did you really expect us not to expound on the reason as part of the previous question? Ahem: "See #3".

As for more on why it wouldn't: The Cold War against the Godless Communists is long over. Political and Religious leaders need a threat, a boogyman in order to keep their flocks contained and money rolling in. We fill that role quite nicely. Even HRC plays the trans card as part of seeking political gain.

5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)

Depends on the rights. Title VII type stuff? Life, Liberty & Persuit of happiness or the ability to not interfere with interstate commerce (ie get married)?

6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?

We all transgress gender expectations for a non-existant but hypothetical 100% male or 100% female in our actions, appearance or identity. You wouldn't think this would be a threat, but by selling it as such religious leaders have gained so much in the last 20-30 years. Enough so that politicians have jumped on board. *That* is our commonality, our common enemy and it is that which we must fight or diffuse or deflect.

7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?

Depending on how you want to group them & for what purpose, each of these will result in different commonality groupings:
By gender.
By somatic attraction.
By social role attraction.
By sexuality.
By mainstream gender expectation transgression.
By political identity.
By activist level.
By mainstream privilege.
By internal oppression.
By political power.
By ickiness
By socio-economic level
By mainstream acceptance of legitimacy
By religion or spirituality
By medical causality

Or you can just lump us all under "political-religious persecution" in which case our commonality trumps all other between group similarities. Except of course, for those that can and do pass for mainstream, but then do they really consider themselves LGBT anyway?.

8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?
I'm going to assume you mean other than family of origin. A Family Member is part of you, you share a common bond despite having possibly very different identities and even histories after a time. An Ally by definition is an outsider that wishes to 'help' you fight your battles, for one reason or another, could even be altruistic.

9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?
Assuming "folks" to stand in for "men, women, etc", in other words somatic sex or perhaps perceived gender, this makes more sense than #10. See #10.

10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?
This makes less sense grammatically, since the trans attempts to modify the sexuality label. Following that, a "trans lesbian" would be a lesbian that loves and has sex with men, I think. And a "trans Bi"? My head just exploded, & I'm pretty good at this stuff. See #9.

1. Can legislation to protect LGB folks also protect T folks?

Unless they happen also to be L, G, or B, only if it's inclusive of T issues.

2. How do cis folk learn what to say when speaking about trans issues, when trans people are so diverse?

How can trans people learn what to say when speaking about trans issues when trans people are so diverse? The diversity indicates a diversity of issues, not all of which overlap. So the only way to learn is to learn, I guess, and that goes for everyone.

3. Would trans only legislation pass Congress?

I doubt it.

4. Why would it or why wouldn't it?

Because not enough representatives in Congress and senators would vote in favour.

5. Is our effort to obtain rights a civil rights issue or a human rights issue? (Note: they are not entirely the same thing.)

Both, although for the purposes of legislation and rights guaranteed under the Constitution, civil rights matter more.

6. What do the parts of the LGBT share in common, if any?

They are discriminated against in similar ways by a society that tends to lump us all together.

7. What parts of the LGBT have the most in common?

I'm not sure what this question means.

8. What is the difference between "Ally" and "Family Member"?

Degree, probably.

9. Are there lesbian, gay, or bisexual trans folks?

Yes.

10. Are there trans lesbian, gay, or bisexual folks?

Yes.