Prince Gomolvilas

"The Lost Coast": A Study in Straight Guys Who Make Mistakes? Gay Guys Who Cower in the Closet? Or Bisexuals Who Come to Terms With the "B" in LGBT?

Filed By Prince Gomolvilas | May 08, 2010 10:00 AM | comments

Filed in: Entertainment, The Movement
Tags: Gabriel Fleming, Ian Scott McGregor, Lucas Alifano, The Lost Coast

I used to make fun of cat ladies. But then I met one. And I came to realize: "Hey, cat ladies are people too!"

I also used to make fun of men in capri pants, those girls who pump lemonade at Hot Dog on a Stick, and bisexuals. Don't judge me. You made fun of all those people too. But then you met some of them, and you thought, "Hey, men in capri pants may have no fashion sense, but they really know how to rock a polo shirt," and "Hey, those girls who pump lemonade at Hot Dog on a Stick look ridiculous bouncing up and down like that, but they must have great upper body strength," and "I used to think bisexuality was just a gateway orientation, but, man, bisexual porn is hot." Or something like that.

My filmmaker friend Gabriel Fleming, who has shouted his bisexuality from the rooftops (or at least on indieWIRE) made a movie called The Lost Coast a couple years ago, and it has just been released on DVD this week (after having an extensive life on the festival circuit and winning Best Feature at the New York Gay and Lesbian Film Festival).

The film is a moody and ultimately moving meditation on twentysomething ennui, compounded by the very mature themes of loss - loss of youth, loss of love, loss of who we once were and can never be again. And it's also about the mystery and fluidity of sexuality - and how you interpret that thematic thread speaks volumes about your worldview.

I generally dislike recounting movie plots, but since you all are just dying to know the particulars I'll just rip off the synopsis from The Lost Coast website:

Mark, Jasper and Lily are high school friends now in their early twenties. Mark is gay, living with Lily (his high school girlfriend), while Jasper is straight and soon to be married. A cynical and bitter trio barely connected by their past friendship, they reunite for the annual public Halloween celebration in San Francisco's Castro district. When the huge crowds of costumed revelers fail to entertain them, they begin a quest to find an elusive acquaintance who might provide them with some ecstasy.

This quest is interwoven with an abstracted remembrance of a high school camping trip the three friends took to the Lost Coast, a lush wilderness in northern California, during which Mark and Jasper were involved in a sexual relationship that Mark never got over, and Jasper never acknowledged.

Over the course of their evening in San Francisco the three are forced to confront this past, which has held them all in suspended animation. The Lost Coast explores the complexities of sexuality, repression, and isolation, with a quiet, measured style.

The film doesn't explore characters as much as it explores characters' emotional states. It's this unique filmmaking vision that lays the groundwork for a deeply affecting resolution, aided by startlingly raw and powerful performances by Lucas Alifano and Ian Scott McGregor.

Look, and I'm not just saying all this because Gabriel, Lucas, and Ian are all friends of mine (and because I conduct part of the interview that's one of the DVD's special features). The movie's great. If it weren't, I would say how much it sucked. (Um, like, remember that other film you guys did? Yeah? Now that one sucked.)

Buy the DVD on Amazon.

Get it from Netflix.

Get it from Blockbuster.


Recent Entries Filed under Entertainment:

Leave a comment

We want to know your opinion on this issue! While arguing about an opinion or idea is encouraged, personal attacks will not be tolerated. Please be respectful of others.

The editorial team will delete a comment that is off-topic, abusive, exceptionally incoherent, includes a slur or is soliciting and/or advertising. Repeated violations of the policy will result in revocation of your user account. Please keep in mind that this is our online home; ill-mannered house guests will be shown the door.


The movie looks fun. I wonder if we'll actually get to see a picture where the bisexual won't be treacherous, murderous, or indecisive.

"I used to think bisexuality was just a gateway orientation, but, man, bisexual porn is hot"

Been there.

cynthia lee | May 9, 2010 10:22 AM

As a bisexual person I have been waiting all my life for the B in LGBT to be properly acknowledged.
I have waited a lifetime for a non threatening or non comical bisexual main character in a major motion picture or popular television show.
Bixesuality is disrepected and discredited by the very people who are supossed to be suporting us. From the same people who sleep with us.
A person who is truely bisexual and not closeted gay is in a serious quandry.
To be bisexual is to be at the core polyamourous. Yet we live in a culture that demands monogamy of its members. Do you know what it is like to love a man and a woman like lovers simultainiously? Both will be expecting you to cut it off with the other. Which of course we ussualy must and do chose one of them. The choice will always leave a hollow pitt in the bisexuals gut. A longing for a lover that is denied by societies very structure.
Bisexuals have a tragic life that is seldom understood or acknowledged by others.
I have litteraly been to the point of destruction over the choice. My boyfriend or my girlfriend? If I do not chose 1 and my mates mesh and we live as a family(as it should be) we are shuned and derided. Even by the LGBT crowd. We are thought to greedy, indesicive, flawed. Basicaly because we have loved.
That hurts.

Gays and lesbians really don't mirror each other when it comes to bisexuality. Rephrase, men and women really don't mirror each other when it comes to sexual fluidity. Men and women don't mirror each other when it comes to sexuality. And yet, lesbians have to deal with the stigma as if we were exactly like gay men. :::Big deep sigh:::

As a bisexual person I have been waiting all my life for the B in LGBT to be properly acknowledged.

Dunno about waiting, exactly, but I'm there with you.

And yet;
I have waited a lifetime for a non threatening or non comical bisexual main character in a major motion picture or popular television show.
Bixesuality is disrepected and discredited by the very people who are supossed to be suporting us. From the same people who sleep with us.

Yes, the portrayals of bi folk are largely pretty poor. But when you go on to say

Bisexuals have a tragic life that is seldom understood or acknowledged by others.

I don't think the 'tragic bisexual' is a paradigm I care to trade any of the current ones for. I'm tired of it in gay lit/media, too; all the "Well of Loneliness" and "Brokeback Mountain" style plot lines where the queer ends up sad, alone and/or dead? No, thank you.

And while I actually *am* polyamourous, it's not because I'm bi, and the implication that all bi folk are (or that all 'truly' bi folk are) is another stereotype I'd rather not perpetuate. Just because someone is bi does not mean they can't be content in a monogamous relationship (and incidentally, there are plenty of het and gay poly folk out there, too, who would not be content in a mono relationship). It may just mean that sex and/or gender aren't a real determining factor in who we're attracted to. This is how it works for me; I'm approximately as concerned with a possible partners sex and gender as I am with their hair (ie, not much).

No, I wouldn't choose between my loves; that's because of who they are, not what they are, and I've got more than one because I'm *poly*, not because I'm bi.

You should get us a few copies to giveaway here on the site to promote the film!