Michael Emanuel Rajner

Off to the White House for 2 incredible events!

Filed By Michael Emanuel Rajner | July 13, 2010 8:30 AM | comments

Filed in: Living, Politics
Tags: National HIV/AIDS Strategy, Office of National HIV/AIDS Policy, President Obama, White House

Over the weekend I decided to take a short break from the AIDS Drug Assistance Program crisis and spent the weekendP7110677-1.jpg ocean kayaking in a BlackBerry-free zone, the Atlantic Ocean. I have a few more ADAP Stories from the Hill that I will posting, but I wanted to make certain to let Bilerico readers that on Tuesday, July 13th, the White House is hosting 2 events specifically for the HIV/AIDS community. I'm packing my suitcase as we speak and catching an early morning flight to attend both events at the White House.

On Tuesday, July 13, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and White House officials will unveil the Obama Administration's National HIV/AIDS Strategy. Watch the presentation of the plan online at WhiteHouse.gov/live at 2:00 p.m. ET.

P7070658-1.jpgSince his days while campaigning for President, President Obama has made this strategy among his top priorities for the HIV/AIDS community. In it, the strategy will spell out how the Administration plans to achieve the following 3 primary goals:

  • Reducing HIV incidence
  • Increasing access to care and optimizing health outcomes
  • Reducing HIV-related health disparities

Last year, I had the honor to be part of the Fort Lauderdale Host Committee for the White House Community Discussion where over 200 people attended to share their recommendations with White House staff. The White House received input from thousands of individuals who attended the 14 community discussions around the nation or submitted recommendations in writing.

In a July 12th New York Times article, Obama to Outline Plan to Cut H.I.V. Infections, it was noted,

One political challenge for the administration is to win broad public support for a campaign that will focus more narrowly on specific groups and communities at high risk for H.I.V. infection.

This is one challenge the LGBT-community knows all to well as we find ourselves on an eternal struggle for social justice. Personally, I look forward to the partners and opportunities the Administration will welcome to overcome this challenge.

Later that day, President Barack Obama will deliver remarks at a White House reception honoring the HIV/AIDS Community. The President's address can also be viewed online at WhiteHouse.gov/live at 6:00 p.m. ET.

I will be certain to take lots of photos and report back on the experience.

White House HIV-AIDS Invite 7-13-2010.jpg

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I hope this plan is as good as it seems you think it will be and not a bunch of empty promises. It is awful that people cannpt get the treatments or drugs they need.

Rann, the National HIV/AIDS Strategy was just posted to the White House website. I haven't had a chance to read. Over the next month, I'm certain there will be some very rich dialogue around the developed strategy and its implementation.

I look forward to dialogue.

bigolpoofter | July 13, 2010 12:27 PM

Here's a link to the NHAS document:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/uploads/NHAS.pdf

I'll give them props for not using MSM in the body of the text, instead calling our Gay and Bisexual men directly, though the graphics are rife with MSM. Guess they got the point from the community forums.

Sadly, there is no reference to the repeal of no promo homo, just broad statements about ensuring funding to target prevention at the groups at highest risk.

All talk.

No action & no money.

Why should we care about this strategty when they don't back it up with implementation?

And don't mention the $25 million from last week. That's not a drop in bucket for the emergency needs.

I've got a strategy. DO SOMETHING more than releasing a piece of paper.