Gloria Brame, Ph.D.

Fowl Play: antique postcard

Filed By Gloria Brame, Ph.D. | August 11, 2010 2:30 PM | comments

Filed in: Entertainment, Entertainment, The Movement
Tags: antique postcard, lesbian interest, naughty postcard, slang expressions

Now here's a slang expression that's undergone numerous linguistic evolutions. Far from its contemporary meaning in gay culture, once upon a time (guessing this card is from 1905-1915) it referred to women who were free and easy with their sexuality. Any cunning linguists know for sure?

Check it out after the jump.

bil-lesbianjusttwochickens.jpg

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Don't some guys still call women "chicks?"

gregorybrown | August 12, 2010 12:23 PM

I remember reading a memoir by somebody who was a prisoner in the vile Andersonville prison camp during the Civil War. He described the way older men would protect--and sexually exploit--younger lads, referred to as "chickens". That was written in the 1870's. It doesn't exclude using the term for women, of course.
There's a regional usage that confused me badly once. I was hitching a ride in 1968 and the driver talked about how he'd had to leave North Dakota or someplace like that because he'd attracted the wrong kind of attention by picking of "cock". Specifically, "young cock". Fortunately, I figured that a 21 year old was too old for someone with such tastes and avoided any embarrassment. I learned later that "cock" is a version of "chick". Maybe I ought to track down a set of the DICTIONARY OF REGIONAL ENGLISH to explore that.

Cock, indeed. National bird out here. You might say rooster, but they say "Cock." Go cock!