Bil Browning

Questions for the candidates

Filed By Bil Browning | August 26, 2010 1:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Politics
Tags: candidate questionnaire, civil rights, comprehensive civil rights bill, gay rights, LGBT rights, omnibus bill

Projector Todd sent in these proposed questions that he thinks all the state groups and national orgs should be putting to Congressional candidates. questionnaire.jpgIt's a good list of well-rounded LGBT issue inquiries and I'd be fascinated to see the responses.

Todd writes, "We can not truly assess our support in Congress until we ask these basic questions about our inclusion in the non-discrimination laws that protect society, laws we call our civil rights laws, but which actually only stop interference with our fundamental human right to exist safely as who and what we are. If we miss the opportunity to ask these basic questions in this election cycle, we have to wonder what exactly our advocacy hopes to achieve and when."

So what're your thoughts? Todd is a big proponent of an omnibus civil rights bill for the LGBT community. Do you think this would help that idea?

QUESTIONS FOR SENATE AND CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATE QUESTIONNAIRES

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN PRIVATE SECTOR EMPLOYMENT

1. Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity," along side "race, color, sex, national origin, and religion," in the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Title VII) provisions pertaining to private-sector employment.

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT

2. Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity," along side "race, color, sex, national origin, and religion," in the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991, the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995, and 3 U.S.C. 411 (a)(1) pertaining to government employment?

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN HOUSING

3. Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity," along side "race, color, religion, sex, familial status, or nation origin," in The Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 3601, et. seq.) pertaining to the sale or rental of housing, real-estate transactions and brokerage services?

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN PUBLIC ACCOMMODATIONS

4. Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity" along side "race, color, religion or national origin" in the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Title II, 42 U.S.C. Sec. 2000e et. seq.) pertaining to places of public accommodation?

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN PUBLIC FACILITIES

5. Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity," along side "race, color, religion or national origin," in the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Title VII, 42 U.S.C. Sec. 2000e et. seq.) pertaining to the use of public facilities?

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN ACCESS TO CREDIT

6. Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity" along side "race, color, religion, national origin, sex or marital status, or age" in The Equal Credit Opportunity Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. Sec. 1691, et. seq.) pertaining to access to credit?

NON-DISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES

7. Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity" along side "race, color, or national origin" in the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Title VI, 42 U.S.C. Sec. 2000d), pertaining to all federally funded programs (reaching deep into health care, HIV, adoption, etc.), subject to exemptions for religious organizations?

COMPREHENSIVE BILL

8. Would you sponsor or co-sponsor a comprehensive bill in 2010 to include all of the above provisions?


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Thanks for posting this!

The idea is to change our expectations, and to ask our 'friends' in Congress whether they really think we are equal and deserve to be included equally in these civil rights laws.

While ENDA covers some of this, shockingly, our community has yet to even file a bill demanding FULL & EQUAL Civil Rights protections.

EqualityGiving.org, and ActonPrinciples.org are supporting a new initiative called The American Equality Bill (AEB), designed to do just that.

I'm working on it full time, as a volunteer, and it's all grassroots.

The bill is done and we now need that first sponsor. For this, we need everyone to ask their own congress person.

This is set up for the grassroots to take control of our own liberation.

2nd class citizenship & 2nd rate demands NO MORE.

For more info, check out: http://bit.ly/AEBnow

Omnibus bill? Because we got so much done these past two years that we need to think of more things to push for?

The questions are fine (although 1 and 2 just aren't going to happen), but they don't really get to the point. What about #9: Did you answer yes to all these questions but still cross the street to avoid gay people on the sidewalk? And #10: Do you actually want a vote on any of these measures or will you quietly push to keep movement from happening?

Bill Perdue Bill Perdue | August 26, 2010 10:38 PM

Actually Number 9 should ask if they'll give up their carrers as hustlers and paid political prostitutes.

And Number 10 should ask if they'll do the decent thing and leave the twin parties of bigotry, war, racism, and economic collapse.


Sometimes in politics, the ask needs to be big enough to build coalitions adequate to push major change through.

It's also a matter of dignity - movement dignity. We haven't even asked for full equality under the civil rights laws. What message does that send?

On 1 & 2, ENDA is very similar to No. 1, but separate and unequal. Discrimination in gov't employment (no. 2) has been addressed actually with various administrative fixes. So No. 1 and 2 are actually the easier ones.

The rest has not been touched, but it's the totality that makes the statement: we deserve equality under America's civil rights laws.

If you believe that we do, then the question is not whether we've failed before, but whether this is the quest we should be on.

Here's the short version:


Do you support the inclusion of "sexual orientation and gender identity" in the 1964 Civil Rights Act (Titles II, VI, VII & VIII), The Fair Housing Act and The Equal Credit Opportunity Act? If so, would you sponsor a bill to do this in 2011.


This is the question we must ask every candidate for public office.

While we're at it, we should also ask ourselves.

Projector Todd