Jessica Hoffmann

Disability Justice Collective at Creating Change

Filed By Jessica Hoffmann | February 03, 2011 2:30 PM | comments

Filed in: The Movement
Tags: Creating Change conference, disability justice

I'm not at Creating Change, but if I were, I would sure be attending some of these sessions put on by Disability Justice Collective (DJC) members Sebastian Margaret, Mia Mingus, and Eli Clare. (Info below via Mia Mingus.)

If you go, tell us about these sessions -- or any others you attend and are changed by!

Thursday, 2/3, 9:30 am and 2 pm: The Familiar Made Strange: An Introduction to Disability Justice

Two repeating introductory sessions will focus on the ways ableism and disability impact our various queer trans/gender-non-conforming communities and activism. Both half-day intensives will focus on the fundamentals of disability justice, and the layered connections between disability, class, race, and queerness, and the necessity of embedding disability justice into our social-justice politics.

Saturday, 2/2: 4:45 pm: Disability and Racial Justice

Join the DJC for a pair of conversations - one for disabled people of color facilitated by Mia Mingus and the other for white disabled people facilitated by Sebastian Margaret and Eli Clare.


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God help anyone who has to deal with the government and disability; for myself my hearing was another extreme trauma piled on top of a series of events which caused my PTSD. And if your disability was caused by governmental discrimination, good luck getting help. The state has a vested interest in denying these kinds of disability claims, since they would also be admitting their own culpability in denying civil protections to an entire class of people. Luckily, I eventually got SSI, but now something as simple as getting a piece of mail or phone call from Social Security is enough to trigger my PTSD to frightening levels.