Alex Blaze

How the US Army Will Implement DADT Repeal

Filed By Alex Blaze | March 18, 2011 9:30 AM | comments

Filed in: Politics
Tags: bisexual, DOMA, Don't Ask Don't Tell, lesbian, LGBT people, military, procedural, reeal

The Huffington Post obtained a slideshow being used army-guy.jpgfor training for DADT repeal in the Army. The full document is after the jump, but here are some bureaucratic highlights that answer a lot of questions people have been asking over the last few months.

  • No one has to change their beliefs, and chaplains are still allowed to say homosexuality is wrong.
  • Discrimination and harassment are already banned, and such bans apply to LGB servicemembers.
  • There will not be separate quarters, etc., for people who aren't comfortable with LGB troops.
  • No one can get out of the military now just because they don't like LGB people.
  • No information will be collected on sexual orientation.
  • Because of DOMA, same-sex spouses are not eligible for the same benefits as opposite-sex spouses of servicemembers, such as health care, clearance to enter another country, military housing as a dependent, etc., although there are some benefits that are already open to anyone a servicemember designates.
  • Information on countries that ban homosexuality will include that fact, but the overseas assignment policy will remain unchanged.
  • Troops discharged under DADT can apply for reentry if that was the only reason they were discharged.


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I kind of had an issue with this one:

Information on countries that ban homosexuality will include that fact, but the overseas assignment policy will remain unchanged.

But then I remembered all the women sent to Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia and realized that it seemed appropriate after all.