Alex Blaze

Queer Music Friday - Wendy Carlos

Filed By Alex Blaze | April 29, 2011 5:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Entertainment
Tags: queer music, Wendy Carlos

Wendy Carlos is an analog synth artist known both for her interpretations of classical composers and her own synth compositions. You probably already know some of her work through movie soundtracks, like Clockwork Orange. This is "The Funeral of Queen Mary":

She also wrote the score for Tron. Here's "Sea of Simulation" from that movie:

She won three Grammys for her 1969 album, Switched-On Bach.


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I like the first one. Thanks Alex.

Lisa Ragsdale | April 29, 2011 9:32 PM

I like just about everything she has composed. I am also a composer and transsexual. When I first transitioned I told my friends, many of whom are musicians that Wendy Carlos and I would now have a lot in common!

I had both of Wendy's Switched on Bach lps, the original in 68 and the second in 74. I still have the 1992 remake on CD and my mp3 player. I remember that her performance of the Third Brandenburg Concerto was very comforting to me through dark and dangerous times as a teenager, even though I was not yet aware of what she and I shared in common. Thank you, Wendy, for touching my life through your music

Kathy Padilla | April 29, 2011 11:40 PM

I still have the Switched on Bach LP - though no longer have a turntable. She's also notable for the first classical album to reach gold record status & several Grammy's.

I remember getting the LP in 74. Although I was practicing the piano for two hours a day, and listening to lots of classical music, I had never been so moved by music. To my 13 year old self, this album was a total revelation.