Adam Polaski

Obama Continues Diversity in Judicial Nominations

Filed By Adam Polaski | July 20, 2011 7:30 PM | comments

Filed in: Politics
Tags: Alison Nathan, Barack Obama, California, Edward DuMont, Michael Walter Fitzgerald, Paul Oetken, U.S. District Court

bio photo.pngPresident Obama nominated Michael Walter Fitzgerald, a gay attorney based in Los Angeles, to the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California today. Fitzgerald's nomination makes him the fourth out judicial nominee to have received Obama's support.

The 51-year-old Fitzgerald works with Corbin, Fitzgerald, and Athey and is an alumni from Harvard University and the University of California Berkley Law School. He's been practicing law for 20 years, and now he hopes to become a district judge.

In a press release, Obama said:

I am honored to nominate Michael Walter Fitzgerald to the United States District Court. His impressive career stands as a testament to his formidable intellect and integrity. I am confident he will serve the people of California with distinction on the District Court bench.


On Tuesday, Paul Oetken became the first openly gay man to be confirmed by the Senate to federal judgeship. Two other gay people - Alison Nathan and Edward DuMont - have yet to be confirmed. Nathan is a nominee to a federal judgeship in New York City, while DuMont has been nominated to a United States Court of Appeals.

The diversity of Obama's judicial nominations is far better than that of previous presidents. Politico reports:

Obama has nominated more female, African American, Hispanic, Asian American, Native American and openly gay candidates as federal judges than Presidents George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George H.W. Bush. That includes two female Supreme Court justices, one of whom is the high court's only Hispanic justice.

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Bill Perdue Bill Perdue | July 21, 2011 9:40 AM

It would be nice if his 'diversity' in nominees to the Supreme Court didn't include same sex marriage opponents, aka bigots, like Kagan and Sotomayor and if his nominees to the federal court didn't include so many anti-union, pro business frauds.

"Equally remarkable was the fact Republicans not only did not block the confirmation of Paul Oetken, but they actually voted for him. GOP supporters included some of the Senate’s staunchest social conservatives: Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, John Cornyn of Texas, Jeff Sessions of Alabama and Jon Kyl of Arizona.

The final vote for Oetken was 80-13.

The nominee’s sexual orientation was deemed unimportant—or at least less important than his moderate politics and his pro-business record (he’s a corporate lawyer, with Cablevision),” wrote Dana Milbank for the Washington Post." WaPo

The lesson here is that if you're a rightwing union buster they don't care who you have sex with. Calling that 'progress' misses the point, which is that Obama is a lap dog of the banksters and the looting class.

Hi.

I haven't been following judicial nominations, and I did note that some of the Senate's biggest sociopaths did vote to confirm this guy, even though some of the same people have been perfectly happy to block the nominations of highly qualified individuals for no particular reason or even, as they have bragged, for spite.

While I feel that lamentably when it comes to respect for the rule of law and support for the people who actually contribute to society rather than those who skim off the top, what we currently have is a third term of George W. Bush, and I am CONSIDERABLY less than enthusiastic about voting for a fourth term of the same, we can't get everything. And after all, people were wrong about Judge Walker.