Dr. Jillian T. Weiss

Lambda Legal Director on the End of DADT

Filed By Dr. Jillian T. Weiss | September 18, 2011 7:30 AM | comments

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"We owe a debt of gratitude to the many brave LGB service members and veterans who stood up to institutionalized discrimination and argued that their private intimate relationships have no bearing on their fitness for military service and their willingness to make the ultimate sacrifice for our country, as well as to the many organizations, activists, and political leaders who made this reform a reality."

Jon Davidson, Legal Director of Lambda Legal, on the end of DADT.


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Hmm. I guess those trans activists who worked for repeal of DADT don't count as to those working on repeal of DADT -- at least per the Lambda Legal statement Jon Davidson.

Seriously, there have been trans people working on just about every LGBT community issue regarding freedom, equality, and justice, and the failure to acknowledge that history of participation feeds a myth with some gay and lesbian community members that trans people aren't there working for LGB trans community issues.

Frankly, I know there's a trans board member on SLDN's staff, and I know a trans staff member at the HRC -- both worked on DADT. And, of course, I handcuffed myself to the White House fence twice to see DADT repealed.

I appreciate the sentiments that Jon Davison expressed in his DADT statement, as far as it went -- I just wish it went further than it did to acknowledge T people participated in the repeal of DADT too.

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california panda | September 18, 2011 7:30 PM

How neat that even Lambda Legal forgets the trans population when it comes to patting ones self on the back. I'm a trans woman with the 3d highest medal the service can bestow on a veteran service member and served over 20 years while being totally silent and "invisible". The arrogance and hubris of self congratulatory individuals over a partial DADT repeal is mind boggling. And all this while one whole segment of the LGBT population is still excluded from open military service. This is not a win, it's segregation. And to Om Kalthoum, your trans bigotry is not at all becoming. What did you risk?

The arrogance and hubris of self congratulatory individuals over a partial DADT repeal is mind boggling.

I hope you mean "partial DADT repeal" as in gays and lesbians still do not have all the rights and privileges afforded non-GL service members; not as in trans people weren't included in the repeal. You surely know they couldn't have been included in the repeal since they weren't included in the original legislation being repealed.

And to Om Kalthoum, your trans bigotry is not at all becoming.

My comment may have demonstrated rudeness, but I feel it is the truth regarding Sandeen's motive. That's not the same as bigotry.

Yes, I can't understand why panda called you out! You always display such a positive, friendly attitude here, and are generally *so* supportive and accepting of trans women!

And those trans women in the military, of course they dont suffer as much as GL ppl, or deserve the same consideration for not being to hide who they are. What gall they have, trying to steal the spotlight from those poor GLs. Truly disgusting.

I think DADT has been part of the same mindset that has excluded trans people, even if in practice we fell under different laws and policies. A setback for this mindset brings us that much closer to inclusion, though we don't achieve it this time around. I prefer "all at once" to "step by step", too, but more than anything, I prefer going forward to standing still.

Autumn--I don't know much about you, but I was thrilled to see an article about you in the Washington Post last winter, shortly after Congress passed the repeal. The article portrayed trans people sympathetically and was a good sort of announcement to the world, to those who may not have known, that the repeal legislation made no provision for the inclusion of trans people. Thanks for your hard work.

On Wednesday, I'll go back to being deeply unhappy about trans exclusion from the military.

Tomorrow, though, I'm gonna party like it's 1999!

Happy Repeal Day!

Queer people forever--lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender!