Fighting Alienation Is a Revolution," Projector Bose left this comment on one of the reasons for social isolationism that has swept large swaths of the world over the past few decades.]]>"/> Fighting Alienation Is a Revolution," Projector Bose left this comment on one of the reasons for social isolationism that has swept large swaths of the world over the past few decades.]]>"/>

Bil Browning

COW: Bose on Social Isolationism

Filed By Bil Browning | October 30, 2011 6:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Living
Tags: Adam Walsh, Bose, large apartment buildings, Occupy Wall Street, social alienation, social isolationism

Over on Alex Blaze's post "Fighting Alienation Is a Revolution," Projector Bose left this comment on one of the reasons for social isolationism that has Thumbnail image for comment-of-week.jpgswept large swaths of the world over the past few decades. It's the comment of the week.

In my midwestern town of 12K, people pride themselves on being neighborly. And yet, I find that vehicles end up keeping people insulated from each other. Attached garages are common, so it's too easy to go from the cocoon of the house to the bubble of the car to the destination free of random human contact, even when it's within a mile.

I'm a walker, driving rarely. The entire town is less than 3 miles from northern to southern points, plenty of businesses and services along the main road through town, so walking my errands is very doable. And yet, it's a surprisingly solitary activity.

It would be great if more folks saw the opportunity walking gives to be social, green and healthy. In my first year or so here, I was often offered rides because it was assumed to be a burden to walk 6-8 blocks carrying groceries or a few tools. Friends and family figured out over time that I walk by choice because it's a viable, great way to go, instead of a no-fun last result.

Other commenters left suggestions from the death of Adam Walsh in the early 80s to "large apartment buildings where every unit can be seen seen as human storage facilities."

What do you think? Why has society decided it is "a sign of status and safety to not interact with others"?


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Wilberforce1 | October 31, 2011 1:42 PM

For one thing, 'others' can be dangerous. Bearing false witness has always been a popular sport of cops and fundamentalists. There are thugs all over the place. And the general public are too heartless and ignorant for my taste.
Meanwhile, social media from tv to the net have made it easier to forgo the social scene.
I also walk and take the bus a lot. But I don't really want to know the general public. Instead, I go to selected activities: a local group for older gay people, or dancing at the gay disco, or reading poetry at the library. These places are safer, and the folks there are at least minimally civilized.