D Gregory Smith

Aurora: The Right To Kill 2

Filed By D Gregory Smith | July 22, 2012 4:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Living
Tags: AFA, Aurora, Colorado shooting, gun control, gun violence, James Holmes, mental illness

After the Gabrielle Giffords shooting, I wrote a piece called The Right To Kill.

I basically said that the insanity of "rights" over the bigstock-Violence-1289782.jpgsafety of human life has come home to roost. The events in Aurora, preceded by shootings in Tulsa, Seattle, Oakland, and Chardon, have brought a little attention to the deadliest shooting crimes in U.S. history - and the world ranking of the United States in terms of gun-related murders (4th highest). 

Nothing is changing. In fact, it's just getting worse.

Joe the Plumber blamed the holocaust on gun control. The American Family Association blames the murders on "liberal churches" I know - I couldn't believe it either. Except that I do. Any tragedy to bring the collection money rolling in is fair game for crazy pastors.

And that's the problem. Crazy people who act out in public seem to give permission to crazy people in charge of congregations and political positions permission to act out, too. To act out with ideology front and center. Not compassion, ideology. And fear.

Like I said, crazy. And people believe them. Instead of statistics. Instead of science. Instead of facts.

Roger Ebert, writing for the New York Times, has one of the most eloquent summaries of the Aurora shooting that I've read so far. From We've Seen This Movie Before:

That James Holmes is insane, few may doubt. Our gun laws are also insane, but many refuse to make the connection. The United States is one of few developed nations that accepts the notion of firearms in public hands. In theory, the citizenry needs to defend itself. Not a single person at the Aurora, Colo., theater shot back, but the theory will still be defended.

I was sitting in a Chicago bar one night with my friend McHugh when a guy from down the street came in and let us see that he was packing heat.

"Why do you need to carry a gun?" McHugh asked him.

"I live in a dangerous neighborhood."

"It would be safer if you moved."

This would be an excellent time for our political parties to join together in calling for restrictions on the sale and possession of deadly weapons. That is unlikely, because the issue has become so closely linked to paranoid fantasies about a federal takeover of personal liberties that many politicians feel they cannot afford to advocate gun control.

I've no doubt that posturing will constipate any real discussion of this issue - but Ebert adds a final, jarring note to his piece:

Immediately after a shooting last month in the food court of the Eaton Centre mall in Toronto, a young woman named Jessica Ghawi posted a blog entry. Three minutes before a gunman opened fire, she had been seated at the exact place he fired from.

"I was shown how fragile life was," she wrote. "I saw the terror on bystanders' faces. I saw the victims of a senseless crime. I saw lives change. I was reminded that we don't know when or where our time on Earth will end. When or where we will breathe our last breath."

This same woman was one of the fatalities at the midnight screening in Aurora. The circle of madness is closing.

Indeed. And it's closing in on all of us.

(Gun violence graphic via Bigstock)


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