Paige Schilt

ABCs of LGBT: Why We Need Inclusive Elementary Schools

Filed By Paige Schilt | October 28, 2013 4:00 PM | comments

Filed in: Living
Tags: AISD, bullying, bullying prevention, education, elementary school, gay parent, gender nonconforming children, lgbt children, LGBT parent, lgbtq family, Rebecca Bigler, school, sexism, Texas, transgender parent, Welcoming Schools

Selma_to_Montgomery_marchessmall.jpgLast year, my son had an elementary school teacher who actually talked about gay people.

Last year, for the first time since kindergarten, Waylon's classmates didn't give him any flack about our unusual family. Fourth grade went by without an insult, an indignant question, or even a casual "that's so gay."

Coincidence? I don't think so.

I happened to be in the classroom on the day after President Obama's inauguration address. The students were studying the civil rights movement.

"Boys and girls," Ms. Hardwick asked. "Yesterday the President mentioned the march from Selma along with two other movements. Who can tell me what other equal rights movements he mentioned?"

Hands shot up around the classroom. I looked at Waylon. I knew he knew. When the POTUS mentions Selma, Seneca Falls and Stonewall in the same breath, you can bet your sweet lentil casserole that it's going to be dinnertime conversation in our queer feminist home.

But Waylon didn't raise his hand. He was waiting to see what his classmates would say.

Mrs. Hardwick called on the first student, a little girl who proudly answered "women's rights."

"Yes, that's right!" the teacher said. "What else?"

At this point, Waylon looked like his eyes were going to pop out of his head. It was a rare--perhaps unparalleled--moment in his education.

Fewer hands were raised now, but there were still some eager answerers. Mrs. Hardwick called on a little boy who was half perched on the back of his chair.

"Uh," he said, as if he hadn't quite thought of what he was going to say. "Gay marriage?"

"Yes," Mrs. Hardwick said. "The president mentioned the fight for equal rights for gay and lesbian people."

I looked at my son and saw relief mixed with wonder. His private home world had emerged into the classroom, and no one made any derisive remarks. It was just a simple connection between the course material and current events, the kind of thing that good teachers do all the time.

But it was a big deal, because the elementary curriculum in Texas is silent on the experiences of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender folks.

be-nice-sign-copy2.jpgCurrently, our district's elementary anti-bullying initiatives tend to be what University of Texas psychology professor Rebecca Bigler calls "pro-social" interventions. They focus on interpersonal conflict rather than intergroup bias and emphasize empathy and social skills over teaching students to name and critique inequality.

When it comes to gender and sexuality, these "pro-social" interventions may miss the mark. According to Dr. Bigler, kids who enforce gender norms don't necessarily intend to be hurtful. Sometimes, they're merely sharing what they believe to be true.

So the kid in first grade--the one who told Waylon that it wasn't possible for two moms to have a child--she wasn't trying to be mean. She was merely sharing what she believed to be true about gender and families. And the current K-5 curriculum wouldn't leave her any wiser on that score.

In a soon-to-be-published paper, Dr. Bigler and her team compared students who received pro-social training to students who received pro-egalitarian training that named sexism and put it in a context of social inequality. They found that students who received the pro-egalitarian training were more likely to be able to critique sexist stereotypes in the media and more prepared to challenge gender-based exclusion and teasing among their peers than those students who received standard pro-social lessons that emphasized inclusion and kindness.

Clearly, I can't prove a causal relationship between my son's year without bullying and his teacher's willingness to name gay and lesbian people and talk about their struggle for equality. But, as a mom and a former teacher, I know that kids are smart. If their classroom lessons are silent on the subject of LGBT people, they're going to understand the underlying message that some people and families are less than worthy.

I'm urging my district to adopt the Welcoming Schools curriculum, which puts LGBT families in a broad context of diverse families and teaches elementary students to avoid gender stereotypes. Welcoming Schools offers a wide range of resources for school administrators and educators to support students who don't conform to gender norms, and it has been successfully implemented in diverse districts across the United States. Read more about it, and talk with your principal and school district about a collaboration that can be tailored to meet your school's needs.
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